How Should I Make My Coffee? | Coffee for Entrepreneurs

So you're trying to make coffee, but you don't know the most effective way for you. Let me guide you through the perks of each process, so you can decide for yourself what suits you best.

 

1. The Drip Coffee Maker

Honestly, I wouldn't probably recommend this to my worst enemy. I find the coffee is always bitter, yet takes a decent amount of time and labor. I used to drink this back when I was just drinking coffee for a quick caffeine fix, but I recommend investing a little more into your coffee making method... a delicious cup of coffee is such a great way to start your day. Anyways, should you choose the drip coffee maker, here's how to make it. The majority of drip coffee makers require a filter, ground coffee, and water. You open up the top, throw a filter in, throw the grounds in the filter, and throw the water in the back. Close it up, press a button, and wait 5 minutes for some sad excuse for coffee. Not the fastest, or best tasting method, but hey, whatever works!

 

2. Pod Coffee Makers

Getting a little better flavor-wise and a lot better time-wise. The coffee still doesn't match up to some of the other brewing methods with the flavor profile, but it's probably the quickest method to make coffee. If you're in a rush, I'd recommend this, but if you want a good-tasting, natural cup of coffee with no additives, this is just slightly better than the drip coffee maker. To use one of these all you have to do is throw a pod in the top, close it, and press the size of cup you want. Wait a minute or two and voila, you've got a cup of pretty subpar coffee. Pod Makers generally have inserts where you can put in your own ground coffee to slightly improve freshness and flavor, but if you're actually going for good coffee, I wouldn't do this.

 

3. French Press

We're getting to better coffee here, but there's a trade-off. With better coffee, generally, it takes more time. French Press coffee is interesting, as the coffee has a slightly thicker consistency, due to the oils remaining in the coffee.  Though a good cup, it's easy to mess up.  Your water could be too hot, grind too course or fine, etc. This can result in a bitter mess. Also, depending on the technique you use, it's easy to end up with coffee grounds in the bottom of your mug. To make a cup of French Press you'll need a kettle to boil water, the French Press, and medium-course grounds. Grind up your desired type of Hustle Bean Coffee, throw it in the bottom of the press, boil up some water in a kettle let the water sit just to cool down a bit, fill it up with the hot water and let it sit for 5 minutes. Stir it, and slowly press down with the plunger. A great cup of coffee and it didn't take too long!

 

4. Aeropress

Now we're getting to a great cup of coffee! The Aeropress is incredibly versatile, so it's great if you're on the go. The Aeropress is such a small, yet genius little device that allows you to brew a delicious, single cup of coffee, with ease. Start off with a medium-fine grind. Bring your kettle to a whistling-boil, and let is sit a minute. Wet the paper disc filter with some water, and place your grounds in the Aeropress chamber, and shake to level out. Pour the hot water into the chamber, to your desired level, and stir gently, if your heart desires. Wait about a minute, and plunge. Be careful to hold the base of your mug, and to apply firm and even pressure to the plunger. You'll be left with a perfectly extracted, flavorful cup of coffee each and every time.

 

5. Pour Over (Chemex)

Easily one of the best ways to make coffee. The Chemex or Pour Over takes the longest, but it's fun and tastes great. It's basically an upgraded drip coffee maker. You start off with boiling water in a kettle. Then grind the coffee beans to a medium grind, not course, not fine. Throw a Chemex Filter on the top, and pour over some hot water to wash out the paper taste. Drain out the Chemex, throw the grounds into the filter and pour over the water from the kettle in 4 or 5 stages with a minute in between each pour. Done! I personally enjoy this method the most. Yeah, it takes a little longer but it gives a nice perfect silky coffee that hits all the notes!